GE9X Engine: Boeing 777-9

Engine B777X

“GE Aviation confirmed investigations are underway, after an “anomaly” was detected in a GE9X engine undergoing predelivery factory tests.”During a factory test an engine gave us a signal about its health,” he added. “We had an anomaly in the compressor and we halted the run.” GE9X General Manager Ted Ingling told Aviation Week that it’s too soon to say if the problem will affect flight tests. A durability issue in the GE9X’s compressor was found in 2018 that caused a delay, Aviation Week pointed out. The business has seen margins shrink while Boeing 737 Max groundings after two deadly crashes are a new risk.

Shaq + Kobe = GE9X

The GE9X is set to be the biggest jet engine in history. It’s wider than the fuselage of a Boeing 737, or as GE puts it, it’s “so large that Shaquille O’Neal would fit inside it with Kobe Bryant sitting on his shoulders.”

The GE9X features the largest fan ever produced, a full 11 feet in diameter. It’s also the quietest, most fuel-efficient, the lowest-emission jet engine from General Electric ever. It will deliver 10% less fuel burn than current models, and a 5% cut in fuel use vs. any twin-aisle engine, thanks in part to 3D-printing technologies.” (Investors Business Daily)

“Boeing is facing major cash flow headwinds due to the pause in 737 MAX deliveries, airline demands for compensation, lawsuits by victims’ families, and expected penalties from regulators. A later-than-expected 777X certification would further depress cash flow next year.” (Motley Fool)

“While the world eagerly awaits the first flight of the Boeing 777X, the US manufacturer has hit another snag, this time with the engines. Following delays to the delivery of the planes carbon fiber wings and the General Electric GE9X engines, it now seems that there’s an issue with the operation of the engines themselves.

(The) long pole in the tent right now is the GE engine. There are some challenges they are working through there on testing. So, we are having to do some re-testing, and they’re working their way through that.

How long will this delay be?

With things not going as smoothly as they could for the development of the 777X, the world is wondering just how long we’ll have to wait to see it in action. Already we’ve had one disappointment, as it was due to be attending the Paris Airshow later this month, but now will miss that event.

Both Greg Smith and Dennis Muilenburg have confirmed that 2020 entry into service is still the goal, but it looks like at this stage the test flight could easily run into early July.

However, with the Boeing 737 MAX disasters still fresh in our minds, the world can wait patiently for the 777X to be ready. Take your time Boeing, and get it right.”                    (Simple Flying)

“One of Boeing’s two 777 9 jets on the Everett flightline with engines exposed. Because of issues with the new giant GE9X, Boeing CFO says the company is pushing back first flight. There was hope, but no @BoeingAirplanes commitment to fly by the end of June. He says by the end of 2019.”

777x

 

 

 

Link: Investors Business Daily

Link: Motley Fool

Link: Simple Flying

 

Aviation Travel Writer: The Flight Times Blog

https://aviationtravelwriter.com/                                                                                                                  https://twitter.com/PorterLafayett1                                                                                                             https://www.instagram.com/flighttimesblog                                                                                                AviationTravelWriter@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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